Day 56 On the nose 27/10/13

Oct 27, 2013 w NZ

Position: 38.45 S, 179.14 W

We’ve been headed by the wind – it’s coming from the direction I want to go, so I’ve tacked into shore. Unfortunately we’re sailing into yesterday’s waves which are right on our nose so we just get going and then we are almost stopped in our tracks by several large waves. The sun is out and I have the cock pit draped with towels and clothes just to freshen things up.

We should be on this tack most of the day before wind swings around to the west. Then I’ll tack and head south. Hopefully I’ll get closer to that ‘sat phone booth’ later today.

Best place for me to be is in my bunk, lying down reading. Eating lunch will be difficult to make, almost dangerous. I’ll snack on food bars instead. Birds all around, mostly petrels. Sailed past a large patch of kelp with a fish in its shadow. I’ll put a new lure on the line and we’ll give it another try. 

Course 320 t Speed 6.5 kts Cloud 30% Temp 18 c Baro 1012 steady Miles in last 24hrs: 135 nm

 

Comments

  1. Nick Goodall says:

    Hi Glenn,

    Time for a silly question:

    I’m not a sailor of any kind, but I looked into it, and it turns out that the prevailing winds in the 40 and 50 south latitudes are Westerly. So it looks like your going the wrong way! Obviously you thought of this before you set off, so why are you sailing into the wind? Is the motion better when you are sailing into the wind or was it just not a big enough challenge to go “down-hill” around the world?

    Just letting you know that even people who know NOTHING about sailing find you blog captivating.

    Nick

    • MaryLou Wakefield says:

      Thanks for the question Nick. Glenn’s attempt at a single-handed, non-stop, west about circumnavigation from North America is the first of its kind. If (when) he makes it, he’ll be the first person to do so. (single handed, non-stop EAST about was completed by Tony Gooch in 2003). This is the most significant challenge Glenn could conceive of which he believes he can accomplish. ML

      • Nick Goodall says:

        Thanks Mary Lou!

        Good to know. Incidentally, I can’t give you kudos enough for the support you give Glenn. You both are telling quite a story. I don’t doubt that the only thing more intimidating that sailing singlehanded through the southern ocean, is sitting at your kitchen table while your other half does it!

        Good luck to you both!

  2. Dear Glenn,
    Perhaps I missed reading a previous blog however, today was the first time, I believe, you said anything about fishing. On this trip or previous trips, what fish have you caught and thrown back, caught and eaten, been the most difficult to land etc. I recently bought the black and white movie by Hemmingway; The Old Man And The Sea. I even own the book, having read it in by grade 9 English class. I read it last year at the cottage and it always struck me with the strong determination, loss, loneliness, and beauty.
    PS tonight I will be eating some B.C. salmon. I “fished it” from Costco.
    Good luck with your lure.
    Doug R

  3. Pat and Fred Lark says:

    Hi Glenn,

    Sounds like things are changing. Have you caught any fish and if you did what would you do? Cool with strong winds here as well. Good luck on the “sat phone booth”. Keeping in touch with family is good for the body, mind, and spirit. As always keeping an eye on you.

    Pat and Fred

  4. Trevor Hurst says:

    Hi Glenn I am glad to hear you are doing well. I wake up every day and look forward to reading your comments it has become a bit of a daily habit. I see you are off the coast of New Zealand now. I was wondering can you see it? Has the boat traffic increased since you have gotten close to land?

    One question I have been meaning to ask is do you have any collision avoidance gear onboard? Since you no doubt spend a lot of time below and sail during nights, how do you deal with the possibility of striking an object in the water too low for your radar to see? I hear a lot about boats striking ocean debris, shipping containers just below the surface things like that. Have you ever struck anything before? Is this a real risk or just more talk? It is a popular enough topic that Robert Redford has in fact just made a movie about. I thought I would check with the experts.:)

    Make great progress today.

    Trevor.

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